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The Horse Reformatory
Throughout the first, world war, via four main depots in Britain, the 'Army Remount Service' had over 340,000 horses pass through their hands.  Those who joined the service tended to be older, more experienced soldiers such as Lieutenant Mike Rimington, late of the 37th Lancers who had seen action in the Boer War. 
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With horses in high demand, Rimington's skills in breaking in unruly and unmanageable mounts were invaluable. He was one of Britain's horse whisperers who ran the Horse Reformatory from stables in Parkgate and Shrewsbury.
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'Savage Simon' had been described as, vicious and quite unmanageable,  has injured six men, some badly, savaged the rough rider and tore the saddle to pieces.
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'Bucking Belle', true to her name, bucks viciously when mounting. 'Winston Churchill' was, 'quite unmanageable, very wild in stable and a dangerous rearer.
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The malevolently named Crippen had actually struck out and killed an unfortunate groom. But, Rimington, the horse-whisperer of his day, tamed them all. 
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Estimates vary but it is thought that around 285,000 horses and mules were killed, or lost at sea during the Great War.  
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The following article appeared in 'The Flesherton Advance' Newspaper, Ontario, Canada 1916.

A friend in England sends us this, story:
One result of the war is the establishment of a reformatory for wicked army horses.
One of these horses was called 'Crippen', but the Camden Town owner of that name was a saint by comparison with him, according to the soldiers who tried to tame him.
Crippen had killed one soldier who had tried to saddle him, and was sentenced to be shot.
That sentence was commuted to one of detention in a horse reformatory.
In this reformatory, near Shrewsbury, the horse criminals, under the care of Lieutenant Rimington, become in time so docile that they will eat sugar out of a lady's hand.
Crippen met his equals at the reformatory. Vicious, sullen horses, horses that looked like villains and acted as such, roamed about the paddock when Lieutenant Rimington walked, like a Daniel, into the lions' den and the animals at once became quiet. The officer carried neither stick nor whip. He understood horses, and, apparently they understood him. They owe their lives to him and seem to be aware of the fact."Anyhow he is soon on Crippen's back, and Crippen is buckjumping in fine western style. Neither stick, whip, nor spur is used to tame him, but tamed he is, in very short time, like the rest of the savage Simons
who have been condemned for murderous practices.

The Shrewsbury horse reformatory, through which hundreds of vicious horses have passed, has proved such a success that the whole process of taming the animals has been filmed, under the title of 'Reforming Army Outlaws,' and will shortly be seen" in Wardour Street, where the picture is sure to win the approval of all lovers of horses.

While the vast majority of vicious horses are undoubtedly made so by those who have handled them, a horse is occasionally born with a stubborn, perverse, and ugly disposition. Even in such a case we do not question that heredity plays a large part and the bad disposition may be due to a sire or dam spoiled by an owner or trainer.


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