THE LOWTHER ARCADE
(The Tin Gee-Gee)
 
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I was strolling one day, down the Lowther Arcade
That place for children's toys
Where you may purchase a dolly or a spade
For your good little girls and boys
And, as I passed a certain stall,
said a little wee voice to me
'Oh I am a Colonel in a little cocked hat,
and I ride on a tin gee-gee.'

Then I looked. and a little tin soldier I saw
In his little cocked hat so fine
He'd a little tin sword that shone in the light
As he led a glittering line
Of tin hussars whose sabres flashed,
in a manner a la militaree
Whilst that little tin soldier he rode at their head,
so proud, on his tin gee-gee
Whilst that little tin soldier he rode at their head,
so proud, on his tin gee-gee.

Then that little tin soldier, he sobbed and he sighed
So I patted his little tin head
'What vexes your little tin soul?' said I
And this is what he said
'I've been on this stall a very long time,
and I'm marked one-and-nine, as you see
Whilst just on the shelf above my head,
there's a fellow marked two-and-three'
Whilst just on the shelf above my head,
there's a fellow marked two-and-three.'

'Now he hasn't got a sword and he hasn't got a horse,
And I'm quite as good as he
Then why mark me at one-and-nine
And him at tow-and -three?'
'There's a pretty little dolly-girl over there,
and I'm madly in love with she
But now that I'm only marked one-and-nine
she turns up her nose at me
She turns up her little wax nose at me,
and flirts with two-and-three.

'And Oh she's dressed in a beautiful dress
It's a dress I do admire
She has pearly blue eyes, that open and shut
When worked inside with a wire
And, once on a time, when the folks had gone,
she used to ogle me
But now that I'm only marked one-and-nine
she turns up her nose at me
She turns up her little wax nose at me,
and carries on with two-and-three.

'Cheer up, my little tin man' said I
'I'll see what I can do.
You're a fine little fellow, and it is a shame
That she should so treat you'
So I took down the label from the upper shelf
and I labelled him two-and-three
And_I marked the other one one-and-nine
which was very, very wrong of me
But I felt so sorry for that little tin soul,
as he rode on his tin gee-gee.

Now, that little tin soldier, he puffed with pride
At being marked two-and-three
And that saucy little dolly-girl smiled, once more
For he'd risen in life, do you see?
And it's so in this world, for I'm in love
with a maiden of high degree
But I'm only marked one-and-nine,
and the other chap's two-and-three
And a girl never looks at a one-and-nine
with a possible two-and-three.
 
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Written and composed by Fred Cape - 1891
Performed by Fanny Wentworth (1849-1934)
Revised and Performed by Mel B. Spurr (1852-1904)
 
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