MAID OF LONDON, ERE WE PART
 
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Up to town one day there came a toff immaculate
Who got mashed in no time on a London Milliner
In his tender cranium he must have had a crack-u-let
Seeing all the presents he kept daily giving her
His walking stick with silver knob. A parrot in a cage, you know
Liikewise a lovely 'thing-a-my-bob' that is a diamond ring
And when the maiden jilted him, and put him in a rage, you know
He spluttered and he stuttered, and he mournfully did sing,

Chorus: 'Maid of London, ere we part
Give, oh give me back my heart, back my heart
Since thou hast gone from my breast, from my breast
Keep the stick with a silver knob given me by a certain snob
Give me back my thing-a-my bob and you can keep the rest.'


Really, it was very hard, a Johnnie fond and dutiful
Being thus invested with the order of the chuck
For the maiden really was exceptionally beautiful
So he bought a piano, to please his little duck
A hundred golden guineas he most cheerfully had paid for it
And, as he'd often noticed, she possessed a charming neck
He laid out just two hundred pounds and had a necklass made for it
And so, he sadly murmured, when his hopes were all a wreck.

Chorus: 'Maid of London, ere we part
Give, oh give me back my heart, back my heart
Since thou hast gone from my breast, from my breast
You can keep the ting-a-ling, you can keep the diamond ring
Give me back the other thing, and you can keep the rest.'


She thought she would like to star in music hall society
So of songs and dresses he'd bought her a perfect feast
Melted just a 'monkey' ere he'd time to say 'yu-li-e-ty'
Eve'ry little ding-dong was ten guineas at the least
She'd worked it with the author and composer, there's no doubt of it
And he stumped up a thing-a-my-jig - well, that's a cheque you know
And when she said, 'Engagement off' and wanted to get out of it
He just glanced at his cheque-book, then murmured in his woe,

Chorus: 'Maid of London, ere we part
Give, oh give me back my heart, back my heart
Since thou hast gone from my breast, from my breast
You can keep the ditties big, dresses, tights and golden wig
Give me back my thing-a-my-jig and you can keep the rest.'


He had bought a lovely house, well furnuished, in Mayfair, for her
Looking forward to the time when she'd to him belong
Just to show her that he meant to do things fair and square for her
Handed her the title deeds, and then she said, 'So long'
He cried, 'Oh, dear me, in the eye she's given me a smack again.'
And fearing what his pa would say, this blessed Simon pure
Wrote, 'Cruel, heartless maiden, send me all my letters back again
And you can keep the bally house and bally furniture.

Chorus: 'Maid of London, ere we part
Give, oh give me back my heart, back my heart
Since thou hast gone from my breast, from my breast
It would give my father fits, if he saw those lines from Fritz
Give me back my twiddley bits and you can keep the rest.'
 
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Written and composed by J. P. Harrington & G. Le Brunn/ J. Tabrar - 1896
Performed by Marie Lloyd (1870-1922)
 
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