Black Pudden

If you can't find what you're looking for on these pages, then post as many details as possible and, hopefully, I or another visitor may be able to help.

Black Pudden

Postby just-george » April 29th, 2012, 8:08 pm

Can anybody help with this one to the tune of Blaze Away?

All of a sudden a lump of black pudden came flying through the air. x3
It missed me father and hit me mother and knocked her through the chair.

Is that the whole of the words, or are there any more words to go with the rest of the tune?
just-george
 
Posts: 17
Joined: February 12th, 2012, 7:36 pm

Re: Black Pudden

Postby Paul » April 30th, 2012, 4:53 pm

I think this is one of those 'barrack room' songs with many regional variations.
When humming the tune, I can recall bits that I've heard over the years:

'Ain't it a pity she's only one titty to feed the baby on.
The poor little bugger will never play rugger or grow up big and strong.'

or

'Ain't it a pity she's only one titty to bang against the wall,
Pity her brother, the poor little bugger, he's only got one ball,
Ain't it a pity she's only one titty to feed the baby on,
And with that, she feeds the cat, so what's the poor bugger live on?'

and the one you mentioned:

All of a sudden a dirty black pudding came flying through the air,
All of a sudden a dirty black pudding came flying through the air,
All of a sudden a dirty black pudding came flying through the air,
It missed me Ma,
and hit me Pa,
and knocked him off his chair!

Any more...?
Paul
Site Admin
 
Posts: 60
Joined: January 23rd, 2012, 1:13 am

Re: Black Pudden

Postby Ivan » May 5th, 2012, 7:25 pm

Yes, well, unfortunately the only other bit I remember will have to be censored here! :

"Old Mother Kitty has only one titty to feed the baby on
poor little f****r has only one sucker to have a chew upon!"

This is typical of the sort of thing work mates are great at doing. Leaving you with just one or two lines and you never get to hear the rest! The one that gets me though is the line "'It's only me from over the sea,' said Barnacle Bill the sailor" I have never heard another line from that. Not rude in itself - but it has potential! Anyone oblige?

"Good Ship Venus" is one of the first I heard, picking up verses here and there and I now know about 30 verses which have built up over the years but that is unusual. It's the one liner that never materialise in full that are annoying. My working life is littered with 'em!

I had one work mate who was in the RNVR who used to come out with snippets from the "Sod's Operas" they held. In the end you wished he'd forget the lot instead remembering intriguing snippets!! Ah, well.
Ivan
 
Posts: 3
Joined: April 24th, 2012, 10:32 pm

Re: Black Pudden

Postby just-george » May 6th, 2012, 7:04 am

No problem with Barnacle Bill - I know all the words to that. Email me and I'll send you a copy. I used to work in contruction. Being able to sing all the words of ribald songs was always a sure reference that you'd been on some 'big jobs'.
just-george
 
Posts: 17
Joined: February 12th, 2012, 7:36 pm

Re: Black Pudden

Postby Paul » May 6th, 2012, 9:55 am

Careful George... I've removed your email address from the above message to prevent misuse.
Once registered, members are able to email other members by clicking on the available icon. All member information is hidden from outsiders (and robots). We don't want you deluged with email ads. for little blue pills and surgical appliances.
Paul
Site Admin
 
Posts: 60
Joined: January 23rd, 2012, 1:13 am

Re: Black Pudden

Postby Ivan » May 10th, 2012, 1:30 pm

Thank you George for the PM with the lyrics.

That has now been put to bed after about 40 years of knowing just the one line! Like a lot of things in life it turned into a bit of a disapointment in the end!!

Like I said it was people like the guy in the RNVR who used to "tease" with these and this just stuck with me. Although I've heard many since!!

I worked with a guy who was in the RN in WWII who also told me about the "Sod's Operas" they held in faraway canteens. The one I can remember him quoting from concerned a sailor who was shipwrecked and "he swam, and he swam. For forty f********* days he swam" until eventually meeting the most beautiful girl on a desert island where she was baking. The whole scene being demolished by the line "and then she far**ed and blew the flour away!"

The trouble with the "Sod's Opera" ones is that they went on forever (Venus being a good example) so the person telling you would shorten them.

Thank you too, Paul for trying to save us from the blue pill merchants - but I'm afraid they succeeded in their endeavours years ago!! :roll: "Rolex" watch anyone??
Ivan
 
Posts: 3
Joined: April 24th, 2012, 10:32 pm

Re: Black Pudden

Postby Clacker » November 10th, 2012, 11:02 am

I thought it was to the tune of the Resdetsky March and the lyrics that I can remember as told by my father are:-

" All of a sudden a dirty black puddin came flying through the air
Did she duck?
Did she F***
it hit her fair and square ....."
Clacker
 
Posts: 1
Joined: November 10th, 2012, 10:56 am

Re: Black Pudden

Postby Whooppee » September 5th, 2014, 4:41 pm

I was looking for this version of Blaze away and stumbled upon these forums.

The version I remember hearing as a child back in the 1950s went as follows:-
"All of a sudden a suet-y pudding came flying through the air
It hit poor old Nellie right in the belly and knocked her off her chair."

Elsewhere on the internet, similar lines are given under the title of "Nellie the cripple."

I wonder if there is more to the saga of Nellie than her unfortunate encounter with a pudding of some description?
Whooppee
 
Posts: 1
Joined: September 5th, 2014, 4:29 pm

Re: Black Pudden

Postby Flavia Vanilla » September 8th, 2014, 10:45 am

Hi there. My contribution follows the line suggested by Paul. I think there are many regional variations. So here is my evidence:-

To the tune of "Blaze Away". The (English) version I know included:

Never been pissed, never been kissed
He's the King of the Fairies

All of a sudden a little black pudding
Came flying through the air
It missed my Ma, and hit my Pa
And knocked him off his chair.

Mrs McVitie had only to only one titty
To feed the baby on
Poor little cripple, he's only one nipple
To gnash his teeth upon


Copied from the website of The Northern Echo and the Darlington & Stockton Times:

All of a sudden
A great big black puddin'
Came flying through the air.
Swift as an arrow
And fat as a marrow
And covered all over with hair.

If you know any ladies
Who want any babies,
Then bring them here to me;
Today's the day
We give 'em away
With half a pound of tea.

[If you can figure out how to use their search feature (I couldn't) you might find more info about that song at the above site.]


"The Northern Echo" printed the following one week earlier:

"Almost everyone will know the words, perhaps with slight variations; the tune may need no rehearsing either...:

All of a sudden
A dirty great puddin',
Came floating through the air.
It missed me mother
And hit me father
And knockeed him off his chair....

Are there any more verses to this North-East classic?..."

The tune is part one of "Blaze Away!" a "March and Two-Step" composed in 1901 by Abe Holzmann (and not, as is often assumed, by John Philip Sousa).

Mrs Mcvittie had only one ****** to feed the baby on
The poor little ****** had only one sucker
to gnash his teeth upon
All of a sudden a big mealy pudden
came flying through the air
did she duck, did she ****
It hit her fair and square.....
Flavia Vanilla
 
Posts: 21
Joined: May 3rd, 2012, 9:37 pm


Return to Looking For A Forgotten Monologue?...

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest